Your Offer SUCKS (What Facebook Won’t Tell You)

You might find this strange…

Many offers that work really well on Facebook just bomb on Google.

If you’re in the process of building your business offering, when you finally figure things out, you expect it to work UNIVERSALLY everywhere.

On every damn ad network there is. You don’t want to rebuild it.

Unfortunately, building and rebuilding marketing is what most people do every time they change platforms.

What they don’t realise is, their offer was NEVER any good. It always sucked. Changing platforms simply amplified this truth.

A good marketing offer should work everywhere. After all, people who use Facebook also use Google, YouTube, Gmail, blogs, Quora, Instagram, Snapchat, Reddit, LinkedIN…

it’s not the platform that changes their willingness to buy…it’s what you offer.

When a platform isn’t working for you, it’s not because there’s some strange creatures using it–it’s how your offer is being distributed and consumed.

By the way, none of this has been my own experience or that of our students. When we build an offer, we build it once, and run it everywhere.

Less work. More money.

i’ve been able to pinpoint the differences in how Facebook and Google distribute ads, and can explain why bad offers might do well on Facebook and never extend anywhere else.

Here are the four differences i found and their explanations…

#1. How you pay
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On Facebook, many advertisers succeed by using the pay-per-view model–they’re charged every time their ad is SEEN.

On Google, most commonly, we pay only when our ad is clicked.

Why does this matter?

Since you pay Facebook for views, their calculation is simple–give priority to advertisers willing to spend more per impression. Deeper pockets = wider distribution.

On the other hand, with Google, who ALSO wants to optimise dollars per impression, they have to infer this by predicting how frequently each ad will be clicked relative to the number of times it’s seen.

What this means is, for a Google ad to do well, the advertiser has to write an effective ad that attracts the clicks of their best potential buyer. Based on that, they’ll get more distribution. A Facebook advertiser, on the other hand, needs only offer to pay more than his competitors to be seen more often–whether or not their ad is any good, whether or not the ad is relevant to their audience, whether or not their ad is clicked, and whether or not anyone buys.

#2. How much space you have
=========================

On Facebook, ads can be as long as you like and can use text, image, and video together.

On Google, if you use text ads, they must be short. Even mixed media ads have limits.

What this means is on Facebook you can potentially put your ENTIRE sales message into the Facebook ad and then show it to every dang body…then optimise around who responds.

Without space limits, you’re free to say as much as you want, even if you fill the space with bullshit. You can dumbass it and play the numbers game while you look for marks who respond to bullshit.

On the other hand, with Google, you have only a little space to say what you need. So you have to optimally use your limited space to qualify and attract clicks from people you believe are likely to convert down the line, and prime them to respond to your offer before clicking.

#3. How you target
================

On Facebook, you target people on the basis of their ongoing interests or behaviours.

You can do the same on Google, but smart advertisers don’t rely on this mode of targeting exclusively. Rather, we target people’s current goals.

What this means is, John might have interests in “business books” and “pop music”…these are ongoing interests.

On Facebook, you can show him an ad about your business book and he might interrupt his socialising/time-killing activities to explore further…or he might not give a shit.

On Google, John is searching for a book on a specific business topic like, how to find investors for his venture…and if you showed him a book about some other aspect of business building, or about the latest release from Lady Gaga, he will likely ignore it–despite both being ongoing interests. At this moment though, they are a distraction from his current goal.

But show him a compelling offer relevant to his quest…You’ll get the sale!

Many dummy Facebook advertisers don’t actually attempt to change behaviour or choose intelligent targeting. They use the interest targeting features to reach an audience of rabid, irrational buyers in the same category as theirs…and they simply place “yet another product” in front of them to buy.

The marketing doesn’t actually have to be compelling or clever at all. Because of how Facebook distributes ads, they can keep searching endlessly for this slice of audience within their interest slice.

The trouble is there’s only so many people who buy irrationally and rabidly in any market, so you quickly reach saturation. Eventually, these advertisers complain, “My acquisition cost keeps going up”…lol

In reality, that’s their tiny slice of dumbass buyers saturated, and now they’re spending money to show their ad to everyone else who could’ve been a buyer if someone actually tried to sell to them.

On Google, it’s difficult to pinpoint that irrational buyer, and extremely expensive to compete for them. So you have to target a more sophisticated buyer who won’t throw their money at the first offer they see. You’ll need to actually change behaviour and sell the benefits, utility, and merits of your product. If you don’t, the relevant choices available to them are endless.

#4. Retargeting size
================

On Facebook, advertisers heavily rely on retargeting to keep talking to the people who showed interest in their ad but did not complete a buying action. Since the original ad view is not very qualified, retargeting is the only option to more precisely reach their audience.

On Google, we already have precise targeting by default and don’t rely on retargeting for all our sales.

What this means is, on Facebook, crappy advertisers bombard the same offer on the audiences who show interest, perhaps a little differently, until they get the sale. Again, very little sophisticated marketing is going on here. They’re often selling something EXTREMELY cheap and then upselling to hell to make it worthwhile.

But on Google, you can start by selling your end product, expensive or otherwise. Simply give people the information they need to make an informed buying decision through email follow-up… This costs nothing extra. But what it does, is it CHANGES behaviour.

So as you can see, Facebook is an excellent platform to advertise on when you’re a crappy marketer with terrible marketing processes.

You can get away with a lot of stupidities and you might actually fool yourself into thinking you’re a REAL advertiser who knows a thing or two. Maybe you can go sell yet another FB advertising course or be a consultant lmao.

You’ll quickly hit the ceiling on Facebook with these dumb methods, and inevitably you’ll go looking elsewhere for traffic.

When you do, you’ll have the rude awakening that your offer was never any good and it doesn’t work on any other platform. And you’ve spent all this money on ads, to learn absolutely nothing about how to sell to your market.

Which is why the Super Traffic Machine emphasizes the fundamentals of marketing and helps you build a proper marketing process.

Not everyone is lucky enough to be in a market where audiences buy rabidly and irrationally. Not everyone can lean on retargeting. Not everyone can afford to play the “numbers game” with their advertising dollar…

But everyone can master the fundamentals of a good business offering.

And it’s why we help you build your offer on Google first. Because if your offer sucks, you’re going to know this pretty fast and you can do things to save it.

When your offer works on Google, take it EXACTLY as is to Facebook, Bing, LinkedIn, Quora, Reddit, Instagram and any other ad network. It just works. Like it should.

Learn more about the Super Traffic Machine below..

~jim

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